Jacintha  Stephens

Jacintha Stephens

Singapore correspondent


Singapore-based Jacintha Stephens has been writing about the Asia cruise industry from the time just a single cruise line based ships in the region.  She continues to cover how the region's tremendous potential is now being harnessed and developed by increasing commitment by all major international cruise lines and regional governments. 

Jacintha, who began as a television reporter in Singapore, has freelanced for major international broadcast, print and online media, as well as authored books. Besides English, she also speaks Bahasa (Indonesia/Melayu), several Indian languages, as well as a smattering of Putonghua (Mandarin).

Technology is playing its part at Hirosaki Park in Aomori, north Japan, providing cruise visitors the opportunity to experience the destination in all seasons, including the spectacular cherry blossom, even if they arrive outside the two week window.

Royal Caribbean Cruises (Asia) Pte Ltd. marked its 10th anniversary Friday with a gala at Singapore’s historic Clifford Pier, with more than 150 trade, media, corporate and government partners from the region.

Energising the shore offering and encouraging Chinese cruise visitors to sightsee on their own is high on the agenda of Fukuoka City's Cruise Promotion Section.

Norwegian Cruise Line’s newest ship, Norwegian Joy sailed into Singapore waters Saturday on her journey for deployment in China.

With its second Southeast Asia season coming to an end and as Ovation of the Seas heads out to North Asia, the Royal Caribbean International ship is leaving heightened brand awareness in its wake.

 

 

 

 

Asian guests are destination-driven and buy cruises after pragmatically comparing land vacation costs versus cruise packages, according to Felix Chan, vp sales, Asia for Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings. ‘They simply choose whatever offers better value’, he commented to media onboard Regent Seven Seas Cruises' Seven Seas Voyager during her recent Singapore call.

At a webinar linking some 1,800 Indian travel agents with Peter Kollar, head of international training and development at Cruise Lines International Association(CLIA) in 2015, they impressed on him just how overwhelming the interest from India was.

Singapore continues to work at harnessing the immense potential that the Indian outbound cruise market holds for it and Southeast Asia.

Tourism authorities from Southeast Asia had their biggest presence ever at this year’s Seatrade Cruise Global to showcase collective efforts under the ‘Cruise Southeast Asia’ brand.

Itinerary options for short cruises from China are limited and pose the immediate challenge for cruise lines cancelling calls to South Korean ports following a political spat between the two countries.

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